How to Make Coffee with a Manual Dripper – Pour Over Infographic

Manual Drip Infographic

If you love drip coffee, but the auto-dripper you are using can’t brew a single cup, pour over coffee is one of the best options. Many people get discouraged by the technical aspect of brewing with a manual dripper. The reality is that it’s not that complicated.

This infographic shows you step by step how to use a pour over device to make a delicious coffee at home. It will be better than the coffee shop coffee.

The most important things when making coffee at home are the grind size and the brewing temperature. These two coffee brewing parameters can dramatically change the taste of your drink. Make sure you adjust these correctly. More on the subject in our manual drip brewing guide.

infographic showing how to make pour over coffee

Share this image on your site!

Pour Over Coffee Recipe

  1. Heat up water to 205 °F in a kettle.
  2. Measure on a scale 30 grams of coffee for every 12 oz of water
  3. Grind the coffee to a medium grind size
  4. Line the dripper with a paper filter and pre-wet the filter.
  5. Add the ground coffee into the filter, and gently tap the dripper to level the grinds.
  6. Start pouring water over the grounds with a circular motion starting from the center to the edges.
  7. Pour just enough to cover all the coffee, and give it a stir with a wooden spoon.
  8. Allow the coffee to bloom and release the trapped gas, and then pour the rest of the water, allowing it to slowly drip. Total dripping time should be around 1 minute up to 80 seconds.

We would like to know what is your recipe for pour over. If you tried our recipe, how did you like it?

How To Make Coffee with A French Press [and Espresso]

French Press Brewing Guide Infographic

The French press is one of the most inexpensive coffee makers, and it is pretty versatile. People who like a stronger, and bolder cup, appreciate this coffee brewing method. Many times French press is compared to espresso, because of the ample body, and the strong aroma and flavor. Even if technically French pots cannot make real espresso, we can get a cup that resembles it. We just have to tweak the amount of water we use during brewing. We have a full French press brewing guide here, if you want to get into the fine details, and perfect your technique.

French Press Brewing Guide Infographic


Share this image on your site!

How to Make Coffee with A French Press

  1. Grind Coffee
    For every 7 oz of water, use 8 g of coffee. That’s about a heaping tablespoon. Grind coffee beans coarsely for a clear coffee, or medium for an espresso body. If you want to get an espresso-like coffee, use half of the water with the same amount of beans.
  2. Warm Up Pot
    Brewing temperature drops fast in a cold French pot.
    Warm up your pot by filling it with hot water. Do that gradually so you don’t break the glass.
    This not only prevents getting a tepid coffee in the end, but it helps a proper extraction.
  3. Add Coffee Grounds
    Remove the hot water, and add the measured coffee grounds.
    Only remove the hot water when you are ready to brew. An empty pot will cool down faster.
  4. Pour Water
    Heat up water to 200 °F. The temperature range is actually between 194 and 200 °F. Lower temperatures will result in a more rounded taste.
    Pour some water over the grinds, just enough to cover the grounds. Stir vigorously to make sure all grinds are wet.
    When you made sure all grounds are saturated, pour the rest of the water and stir a couple more times.
  5. Seal Pot
    Press the plunger down to the water level, and close the lid. Make sure you turn the lid shut, so you seal it. Let it steep 3 – 5 min, according to your preference.
  6. Filter It
    After the 5 minutes, push the plunger all the way down, with a slow move. Press slowly, and don’t rush it up. If you press to hard, you’ll end up with silt and grounds in your coffee.
  7. Pour in Cups
    Pour in cups and serve immediately. Coffee is best served hot.
  8. Clean It
    Clean the pot by rinsing with warm water.

How to Make Espresso with an Espresso Machine – Infographic

SemiAutomatic Machine Espresso Machine Brewing Guide Infographic

Brewing espresso with a semiautomatic machine is a skill that starts to disappear. The convenience of super automatic machines shifts the buying preferences of the modern coffee lover. There is also the beverage preference that plays a role, but is not the subject of our brief guide. This infographic is the shortest guide possible, to get you started. We have the written version after the graphic, and is a bit more detailed. However, if you want to perfect your technique, and pull cafe quality shots, check our detailed espresso brewing guide.

Espresso brewing infographic

Share this image on your site!

  1. Use Good Water
    Fill up your water reservoir. The best is spring water, but distilled water works too. Distilled water is good because is odourless and tasteless, and it prevents scaling. But spring water gives your shot the extra taste dimension that it needs.
  2. Turn On the Machine
    Ensure the boiler is hot. The light on your machine will indicate when the machine is ready.
  3. Dose your coffee.
    If your grinder doesn’t have a doser, weighing on a scale is the best option. Use 14-18 grams of coffee beans for a double espresso. Use 7-9 grams for a solo. You can still use volumetric dosing, by measuring the scoops. What I do, is measure by scoops, and then weigh the beans. When I change the beans I repeat this operation.
  4. Grind Coffee
    Grind your coffee finely. The grind size is smaller than for drip coffee, but not quite powder. Table salt is good comparison size.
  5. Fill the Portafilter
    Dump your coffee grounds in the portafilter, aiming to distribute them evenly in the filter basket. Lightly tap the portafilter to achieve perfect distribution. You can tap with your knuckles on the sides of the portafilter, or knock it on the tamping mat. This is an adapted technique. If you have a grinder with a doser, step 5 and 6 are a single step.
  6. Tamp it.
    Give it a good tamp, aim for about 30 pounds of pressure. That pressure can vary, depending on your coffee variety and roast, and the grind size. But as a beginner, you need to change just one variable at a time. So be consistent with your tamping force at 30 pounds.
  7. Start Brewing
    Lock in your portafilter into the brew head of your machine and press the brew button.
  8. Pull the shot
    Aim for a 25 seconds extraction time. Depending on how fine is coffee ground, this can vary up and down by 5 seconds. The extraction time is the same, whether it is a solo, or a doppio.

Happy brewing!

This infographic is a simpler, graphical version of our guide on how to use a semi-automatic espresso machine. We love this infographic because is a fast way to start. We do recommend you though, to bookmark our espresso tutorial here, as a comprehensive list of articles on the topic, including espresso pulling, milk frothing, espresso alternatives, and brewing equipment.

 

How to Make Coffee with an AeroPress – Infographic

Here is a simple step-by-step guide on how to use an AeroPress. Coffee prepared this way is a bold, full bodied cup. At the same time, the cup is very smooth, without the harsh notes and the bitterness associated with French Press. It is an inexpensive way to make an espresso alternative. Here is the recipe as an infographic, or lower in the page as a text :

Share this image on your site!

  1. Heat water
    Heat your water to 175 to 180 °F. If you don’t have a variable temperature kettle, or a thermometer, boil the water and let it sit for about two minutes.
  2. Rinse the Filter
    Place the paper filter inside the cap and rinse it with hot water. This way, you eliminate the filter’s papery taste, and you seal it inside the cap.
  3. Weigh and grind beans
    Use a scale to measure about 16-17g of beans. Grind the coffee slightly coarser than filter.
  4. Mix Coffee and Water
    Place your cap on the AeroPress and dump the grounds in. Add half of the water.
  5. Bloom
    Give it a few stirs and let the grounds bloom for 30 seconds. This allows the trapped gas to be released from the coffee and it helps the extraction.
  6. One more Stir
    Give it one or two more gentle stirs, and fill the AeroPress almost to the top. Allow some room for the plunger.
  7. Steeping time
    Insert the plunger in the brewing chamber, (just enough to seal it), and place the AeroPress on a cup, with the cap down.
  8. Filter It
    Press down with steady pressure to the end. Enjoy.

If you need a more thorough brewing guide, with geeky facts, tips and tricks, check our in depth AeroPress tutorial.

This infographic is part of our guide on how to brew espresso at home. AeroPress coffee is not espresso, but it is a great alternative, for those on a low budget. The advanced AeroPress guide shows you some great tips on how to pull shots that can pass as espresso. If you just need the coffee for a latte, don’t worry too much about “semantics”, this is perfect for your needs.