How to Make Coffee with a Moka Pot – Infographic

Infographic - How to Make Coffee with a Moka Pot

We created this infographic for the time-pressed coffee lover that needs a strong coffee and needs to stay on a low budget. Many people call it stovetop espresso maker, because it brews a strong and bold coffee, and it uses pressure during extraction. And we agree with that, moka pot is in many ways very similar to an espresso. Moreover, we can use it to prepare a beautiful latte or a delicious cappuccino, or a flat white. Here is the infographic, and at the end of the graphic, you also have a written version of it. 

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  1. Grind the coffee beans using a good burr grinder. The grind size is slightly coarser than espresso but finer than drip.
  2. Fill the base of your moka pot with hot water up to the line, or slightly below. Never pass the sign.
  3. Place the funnel in the boiler chamber, (the base).
  4. Loosely fill the filter-funnel with coffee grounds. Do NOT pack the grounds as we do with espresso. If you pack them, the coffee will not rise in the collector chamber. Or it will rise too slow, and over-extract.
  5. Make sure rim is clean and screw on the top chamber onto the boiler. If the rim is not perfectly clean, the pot will lose pressure.
  6. Put the Moka pot on the burner on low, or medium heat. A gas stove is the best. The electric stove works too, but you need to use a heat diffuser.
  7. If you used hot water, after two minutes coffee will start to flow. If you used cold water, you’ll wait about 6-8 minutes until the top reservoir is full.
  8. Once coffee starts to flow in the top carafe, immediately take it off the heat. The residual heat will be enough to finish the brewing. Some people leave it on the stove until coffee is almost completely brewed, and then cool the base off with cold water to stop the brewing.
  9. Stir in the upper chamber with a spoon to mix the different coffee layers for uniform flavor.
  10. Pour it in cups right away.

For a complete how-to, and more brewing tips, read our full tutorial about Brewing with a Moka Pot.

People call moka pot “stovetop espresso”. The term is not a complete misnomer, because the brewing method uses pressure in the preparation process, and the cup you get is bold, thick and flavorful, similar to espresso. This why we included this infographic in our home barista espresso guide. You can make great lattes and cappuccinos using stovetop espresso, and you can even drink it neat. However, real espresso is a distinctive coffee, that needs more pressure and a controlled brewing temperature.

How to Make Coffee with an AeroPress – Infographic

Here is a simple step-by-step guide on how to use an AeroPress. Coffee prepared this way is a bold, full bodied cup. At the same time, the cup is very smooth, without the harsh notes and the bitterness associated with French Press. It is an inexpensive way to make an espresso alternative. Here is the recipe as an infographic, or lower in the page as a text :

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  1. Heat water
    Heat your water to 175 to 180 °F. If you don’t have a variable temperature kettle, or a thermometer, boil the water and let it sit for about two minutes.
  2. Rinse the Filter
    Place the paper filter inside the cap and rinse it with hot water. This way, you eliminate the filter’s papery taste, and you seal it inside the cap.
  3. Weigh and grind beans
    Use a scale to measure about 16-17g of beans. Grind the coffee slightly coarser than filter.
  4. Mix Coffee and Water
    Place your cap on the AeroPress and dump the grounds in. Add half of the water.
  5. Bloom
    Give it a few stirs and let the grounds bloom for 30 seconds. This allows the trapped gas to be released from the coffee and it helps the extraction.
  6. One more Stir
    Give it one or two more gentle stirs, and fill the AeroPress almost to the top. Allow some room for the plunger.
  7. Steeping time
    Insert the plunger in the brewing chamber, (just enough to seal it), and place the AeroPress on a cup, with the cap down.
  8. Filter It
    Press down with steady pressure to the end. Enjoy.

If you need a more thorough brewing guide, with geeky facts, tips and tricks, check our in-depth AeroPress tutorial.

This infographic is part of our guide on how to brew espresso at home. AeroPress coffee is not espresso, but it is a great alternative, for those on a low budget. The advanced AeroPress guide shows you some great tips on how to pull shots that can pass as espresso. If you just need the coffee for a latte, don’t worry too much about “semantics”, this is perfect for your needs.

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